When science gets politicised – @mattwridley

“In 2013, you may recall, the European Union banned some uses of neonicotinoid insecticides to save bees. The verdict on this policy has now come in, from the commission’s own Joint Research Centre (JRC)…Its conclusion is that the ban has been disastrously counterproductive, resulting in an increased use throughout the continent of more damaging pesticides, […]

Andrew Marr

The dark-shadowed sweet shop of the internet – @AndrewMarr9 #Writing

An Oakeshottian* conservative’s view of the world, per Andrew Marr: “Superabundance is foisted upon us as the only sure route to happiness. And from the dark-shadowed sweet shop of the internet to the imminent arrival of driverless cars, we prefer the untried to the tried every time.” A thought-provoking column from Andrew Marr in yesterday’s […]

The rehabilitation of Michael Gove

Since leaving office, in the bizarre aftermath of the Brexit vote, Michael Gove has returned to his prior career as a writer, writing a regular column for the Times. His two latest contributions are excellent, objective observations on current events. The first, in the immediate aftermath of the Westminster attack, contemplates how best to respond […]

Food miles – not what they seem

An interesting post from Oliver Riley on the Adam Smith Institute blog: Save The Environment – Don’t Buy Local. “Those who encourage us to buy locally often do so with the view that reduced transport distances will result in less CO2 emissions. Seems simple, but what such people neglect is the fact that the majority […]

The relevance of Ayn Rand – @ASI

Eamonn Butler, at the Adam Smith Institute, discusses the increasing influence of Ayn Rand 35 years after her death.  

The power of parliamentary assertiveness, reformation radicalism and Lockean liberalism – Michael Gove

Michael Gove has a thoughtful column in today’s Times (requires free registration). It echoes an argument I’ve heard in a few places over recent months; broadly that we – the liberal, democratic, West – need to be prepared to assert and defend our beliefs. Indeed, need to assert that these are our deep-rooted and long-standing […]

The cost of climate change policy – @mattwridley

Matt Ridley has posted his Times column on the cost and consequences of the government’s ill-conceived climate policy, here. It doesn’t really matter where you stand on climate change –  unreal, real and devastating or real but not actually cataclysmic – no-one is ever served by bad policy, founded on poor analysis and dishonestly presented: […]

Matt Ridley on an ice-free Arctic Ocean and much more

I’ve long been a fan of Matt Ridley’s column in the Times, so I don’t know I didn’t think to find his blog before now. Here it is. Here’s his excellent piece on the Arctic Ocean and evidence that it was ice free in the past: This was a period known as the “early Holocene […]

Politics is the art of looking for trouble …

Groucho Marx via Execupundit: “Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies.” Our Home Secretary’s skin-crawlingly poisonous plan to force firms to declare their foreign workers comes to mind. That can hardly be a way to build a successful, global-trading economy. It’s no way to […]

Casual contempt for the customer #Volkswagen

The discovery that Volkswagen’s US models were fitted with a device that automatically cheated environmental tests will cause huge damage to the firm. Already, facing fines that could reach $18bn, the company’s shares have plunged 23%.  However, fines may only be the most concrete issue; a company that has long traded on its reputation – […]

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