Why rare books are thriving – @Spectator_Life

The Spectator has an interesting piece on collecting rare books in the digital age, here. The article centres on one of London’s oldest antiquarian booksellers, Maggs Bros (Maggs.com), which I feel must be worth a visit.

The Economist on translators – #writing

Having touched on translations the other day, I’ve just read a piece in this week’s Economist; Why Translators Have The Blues. It discusses the challenges facing the profession from machine-learning and globalisation. Lessons here for writers, too.  

Something for the weekend? How stories last – Neil Gaiman #Writing

Here’s a delicious use for 100 minutes of your weekend. In June 2015, Neil Gaiman gave a talk at the Long Now Foundation on the nature, power and evolution of stories. Are stories alive? He talks about our symbiotic relationship with stories and how animals live for, perhaps 30 years at most; trees can live for a […]

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science by Diane Stanley

Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science – @brainpicker

The BrainPickings blog highlights this engaging children’s book about mathematician, computing pioneer (and much more), Ada Lovelace: Sounds like it should be required reading to small children everywhere. By the way, reading this I learn that Ada Lovelace was the daughter of the poet Lord Byron; something I feel I should have known already.

Animal Farm

Execupundit prescribes Animal Farm, to be taken annually. I re-read it a few months ago, for the first time since school. Required reading for our post-truth times.

We are not numerate …

Steve Layman reminds us that, in general, we are not numerate: “ most people just don’t understand how [compounding] works. For instance, 10% growth for 25 years is not 250%, it’s 985%!” Douglas Adams understood, of course, and illustrated its power – especially if combined with time travel – in paying your bill at Milliways, the Restaurant […]

The post-Christmas reading shelf

(plus a little, stray listening too large for the music shelves) It groans in weight and eager anticipation. There is no particular order, but I’ve already started The Word Detective and Dear Mr M.    

Santa Claus vs. Father Christmas

Santa Claus was the vanguard in America’s war of cultural imperialism. Who knew?!?! Mark Forsyth has an excellent piece on the origins of both Father Christmas and Santa Claus.  They are not, it turns out, one and the same, but nineteenth century, transatlantic rivals. Forsyth’s new book, A Christmas Cornucopia, is top of my own Santa […]

Not just a secret door …

… but a secret door in your library! Kurt shares some objects of desire, here. What could possibly be better?

So obvious to say, so very hard to do … @execupundit

Sage advice from Michael Wade at Execupundit: Be sure to schedule time for two things …  

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