The Economist on translators – #writing

Having touched on translations the other day, I’ve just read a piece in this week’s Economist; Why Translators Have The Blues. It discusses the challenges facing the profession from machine-learning and globalisation. Lessons here for writers, too.  

Wind turbines are neither clean nor green – @mattwridley

Some powerful data on the wrongheadedness of the pursuit of wind power: “…we can see that wind provided 0.46 per cent of global energy consumption in 2014, … world energy demand has been growing at about 2 per cent a year for nearly 40 years… If wind turbines were to supply all of that growth […]

Science isn’t something to believe or not believe. It’s something to do – @thisisseth

Another from Seth Godin: “Science is a process. It’s not pretending it has the right answer, it merely has the best process to get closer to that right answer. Science is an ongoing argument, one where you show your work and make a prediction about what’s going to happen next.” We desperately need more science, […]

burning pine - planner

Slice Planner: a daily planner that merges paper and digital

Via The Cramped, is news of a fantastic concept currently on Kickstarter. It’s a diary / planning solution that combines the visceral delight of real paper and pencil with the sheer and shareable convenience of digital. What a great idea! You can plan your day on paper, then use your phone’s camera to synch it […]

Social media, politics and narrative – @roughtype

Here’s a great essay from Nicholas Carr on social media’s effect on the US presidential campaign, and much more.  It explores how social media is different from previous media – not necessarily better or worse, but different – and how that requires a different approach: “The message, as always, has to fit the medium.” Reflecting […]

The power of proper paper #writing

Messy, unwieldy, noisy, and yet … Kurt Harden hits on the unique delight in reading an actual, paper, newspaper. I love reading the Economist or (London) Times on my iPad, but real paper is different. You see different things, the format allows for greater serendipity.  It’s more tactile, too. And, of course, paper is lower […]

Thoughts on Ad-blockers

Ad-blocking software has been big news over the last couple of weeks.  This week, even The Times devoted a leader to it (Ad Armageddon, firewalled, though it should be accessible via my Tweet). That increasing numbers of people now choose to avoid intrusive, irrelevant and increasingly annoying ads is no surprise.  I research a wide […]

How to write a book when you’re paid by the page – Nicholas Carr

Sage advice from Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows, amongst other books: “I thought I might be able to start publishing long books of computer-generated gibberish and then use Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service to pay Third World readers to scroll through the pages at a pace that would register each page as having been read. If I […]

Analog(ue) Sunday – Cultural Offering

This just sounds idyllic, Kurt Harden’s Analog Sunday: “Brisket on the smoker.  Pink Floyd on the stereo.  Not a thing on the television or computer.  Unplugged …” The rest, here.

I am what I read

Two interesting posts… In The Medium is the Moral, Nicholas Carr debates the extent to which we surrender our morality to technology. In Is Google Making the Web Stupid? Seth Godin reflects on the unintended consequences of our reliance on a search algorithm that must be purposed to driving revenue. Both remind me of a […]

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